Young North American cast creates bubbly atmosphere for Die Fledermaus

Jan. 8, 2014
Media contact: Jelena Bojic, assistant general manager & director of community relations
780-392-7837; jelena.bojic@edmontonopera.com

Famous for its chaotic plot and catchy melodies written by the Waltz King Johann Strauss II, many of the artists performing in the February production of Edmonton Opera’s Die Fledermaus have a personal connection to the work.

Director Allison Grant has previously choreographed and been the assistant director four other times on the popular German opera  — performed in English at the Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium — including a 1996 EO production under Kelly Robinson.

“I particularly enjoy working on Die Fledermaus because of its dance element, but also because of the infectious quality of music,” said Grant, who added that she was initially attracted to opera because of the large choruses, big orchestration and intensely felt human stories.

She is directing a cast of young singers from across North America, many who list Die Fledermaus as one of the first operas they ever performed. Baritone Peter McGillivray (Dr. Falke) has previously performed the work completely in German, as well as sung in German with English dialogue, but added this will be the first time he has done the entire production in English, and expects the language to allow for some fun interaction between the characters.

Just as the work has made an impression on many of the artists performing it, the Edmonton Opera expects that the casting will create a memorable experience for northern Alberta audiences.

Normally cast as a trouser role (sung by a mezzo-soprano), Prince Orlofsky can also be sung by a countertenor — a male voice that exerts control over the falsetto range. American Gerald Thompson portrays the Russian prince in the EO production, who declares that he is bored with everything life has to offer, yet encourages his guests at the Act II ball to drink champagne and enjoy themselves.

A sparkling comedy in three-quarter time, Strauss treated the events in this operetta with the same zest for life that punctuates his music, making this the perfect production during an Edmonton winter. 

To arrange interviews with any of the artists, please contact Jelena Bojic, assistant general manager and director of community relations, at 780-392-7837 or jelena.bojic@edmontonopera.com.  The media dress rehearsal will be held on Jan. 30 at 11 a.m. at the Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium; Die Fledermaus will be performed Feb. 1 (8 p.m.), Feb. 4 (7:30 p.m.) and Feb. 6 (7:30 p.m.), 2014.

 

-30-

More media releases

Edmonton Opera presents a new mini-opera at Opera al Fresco

As part of a new mini-opera in the Devonian Botanic Garden, Opera al Fresco audiences will be greeted on June 20 by a Japanese demon, a bridge builder who can’t build bridges, and a group of children who can’t cross the river.

The 15-minute opera, The Carpenter and the Oniroku, has been specifically written for the Edmonton Opera Children’s Chorus, based at Victoria School of the Arts, with the Devonian’s Japanese Garden in mind.

Edmonton Opera presents acclaimed Madama Butterfly production

Puccini’s libretto tells a simple, timeless love story that crossed oceans, and Edmonton Opera’s production of Puccini’s Madama Butterfly does the same thing— literally.
The final opera of the 2013/14 season is a revival of the acclaimed Opera North production in Leeds, England, directed by Tim Albery and with French soprano Anne Sophie Duprels returning to the title role.

During a performance at the Grand Theatre in Leeds, a Telegraph reviewer described Duprels’ voice by saying, “For sheer sweetness of personality, for sheer pathos, I have seen few to match her.”

Cast of characters blame it on the champagne for Die Fledermaus

A romantic musical comedy, Edmonton Opera’s production of Die Fledermaus opens at the Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium Feb. 1 (tickets are nearly sold out) and continues Feb. 4 and 6.

The media dress rehearsal will be Thursday, Jan. 30, at 11 a.m. Good visuals occur at approximately 12:20 p.m., when there is a large number of cast members and chorus on stage during the masked ball scenes.

Pages