Canadian opera premieres this month

For Immediate Release November 8, 2012
Media Contact Jelena Bojic, Director of Community Relations
jelena.bojic@edmontonopera.com
780.392.7837

The complicated, scientific world of nuclear fission is given a human voice in Shelter, the first production in the Edmonton Opera’s ATB Canadian Series.

Opening on Nov. 15, this is the first time ever the contemporary opera has been performed, and it’s a joint effort between Edmonton Opera and Toronto’s Tapestry New Opera.

“The corporate leadership demonstrated by ATB Financial means that the Edmonton Opera and Tapestry New Opera are able to continue to give a strong voice to the arts through this initiative,” said Sandra Gajic, Edmonton Opera CEO. “Shelter and Svadba – Wedding will be presented in smaller, more intimate venues, allowing audiences to experience something new and intriguing.”

Thomas and Claire meet at a party and fall in love — in that awkward, love-at-first-sight way — get married and have a daughter, Hope. The child glows in the dark. As she grows up, she is tutored by the character Lise Meitner, a real-life scientist who worked on the discovery of fission. The Pilot enters the story when Hope turns 21, and he’s the one who alters the tale completely.

The ATB Canadian Series is intended to build new audiences by offering exciting new productions, contributing to the arts and cultural scene in the city. This is also the first time that the Edmonton Opera has partnered with ATB Financial to present operas like this.

“Opera, operable, operation, they’re all words that suggest something is at work, something is on the go,” said Dave Mowat, president and CEO of ATB Financial. “We think you’ll come away from these performances appreciating the experience of Canadian-produced opera. It’s contemporary. It’s from our storytellers. It’s for us. It’s good work.”

Please note the media call will only be on Nov. 14. For media passes, please contact Jelena Bojic, director of community relations, at jelena.bojic@edmontonopera.com or 780-392-7837.

Shelter: Nov. 15, 16, 17 and 18 at La Cité Francophone
Movie screening: Village of Widows, Nov. 13, 7 p.m., Citadel Theatre’s Zeidler Hall, free admission Panel discussion: Nov. 14 at 6 p.m., La Cité Francophone
Atomicalia: exhibition of items and pop culture created during the Cold War, Nov. 14-19, La Cité

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Storm the Stage brings arts patrons onto the opera set

Not only is the Edmonton Opera recognizing the 200th anniversary of composer Verdi’s birth with the production of Aida, but we’re also throwing a party.

The fifth annual Storm the Stage — a party on the opera set — will be held on Oct. 20, during a non- performance night of Aida. Edmontonians are invited to experience Egypt on the Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium stage during this unique arts event.

Opera 101 provides context, extensive background

Before the curtain rises for Aida this October, the Edmonton Opera presents Opera 101, a panel discussion to break down the intricacies of one of Verdi’s most well-loved and grandest operas.

Five panelists, including Stephan Bonfield, Dr. Julián Castro-Rea, Dr. Magdy El-Shamma, Dr. Benjamin Garstad and Dejan Miladinovic, will discuss Aida on Oct. 10 at 7 p.m., at the Art Gallery of Alberta in the Ledcor Theatre.

Matinée programming adds flexibility to opera schedule

Opera is even more accessible during the 2012/13 season, as the Edmonton Opera has made changes to its production schedule to allow for matinée performances.

In addition to three nighttime performances, there will be a 2 p.m. performance on the Sunday during the production run. This earlier performance allows for out-of-town opera enthusiasts to enjoy the performance without making an overnight trip, or for families to expose their children to the art form and still make it home at a family-friendly hour.

Season starts with grand opera

One of the grand operas, Aida will grace the Edmonton stage for the first time in over a decade when the Edmonton Opera opens its 49th season next month. Celebrating the 200th anniversary of Verdi’s birth, Edmonton Opera joins other opera houses around the world honouring the great composer and his works.

The Verdi masterpiece will be presented in its full splendor, with roughly 100 performers, including principal artists, chorus members, supernumeraries and Brian Webb dancers on stage together at any given time.

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